Bryce Canyon National Park, Sunrise, Bryce Point Overlook

Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah is a fairyland of red, orange, and white hoodoos and spires. The rim elevation varies from 8,000 to 9,000 feet.

Rooms in the park can be difficult to obtain, so book early.

The images in this article were taken in Late July and Early August. As is typically the case at Bryce Canyon, sunrise generally presents more opportunities than sunset.

Continue reading “Bryce Canyon National Park, Sunrise, Bryce Point Overlook”

Bryce Canyon National Park, Sunrise, Fairland Canyon Viewpoint

Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah is a fairyland of red, orange, and white hoodoos and spires. The rim elevation varies from 8,000 to 9,000 feet.

Rooms in the park can be difficult to obtain, so book early.

The images in this article were taken in Late July and Early August. As is typically the case at Bryce Canyon, sunrise generally presents more opportunities than sunset.

Continue reading “Bryce Canyon National Park, Sunrise, Fairland Canyon Viewpoint”

Bryce Canyon National Park, Thunderhead at Sunset, Sunrise Point

Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah is a fairyland of red, orange, and white hoodoos and spires. The rim elevation varies from 8,000 to 9,000 feet.

Rooms in the park can be difficult to obtain, so book early.

The images in this article were taken in early August. Both are panoramas taken just behind the railing at Sunrise Point and just before sunset.

Continue reading “Bryce Canyon National Park, Thunderhead at Sunset, Sunrise Point”

Bryce Canyon National Park, Winter Sunrise, Sunset Point

Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah is a fairyland of red, orange, and white hoodoos and spires. The rim elevation varies from 8,000 to 9,000 feet.

Winter comes early. The park is open year-round but rooms at the lodge are generally closed January and February.

Rooms in the park can be difficult to obtain, so book early.

The shots in this article were taken in November. We were booked at Zion National Park which is about 90 minutes away, but when the weather forecast called for snow at Bryce, I double booked for a night hoping to catch snow on the hoodoos. These are the resultant images.

Continue reading “Bryce Canyon National Park, Winter Sunrise, Sunset Point”

Great Smoky Mountains National Park – Little Pigeon River – Spring

Looking for spring wildflowers? The Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee is one of the best spots around. The last half of April is typically the peak time, but the timing can vary year to year.

If you miss the wildflowers, the streams are still beautiful. The images on this page were taken on the West Prong of the Little Pigeon River.

Feature Image Details

To capture scenes like these you need a long exposure. Depending on how fast the water is flowing, the range may be between 1/4 second and several seconds.

One second worked nicely for this image.

But that’s not the only requirement. One needs little to no wind, especially if there are flowers that may be moving. Finally, bright overcast or very weak sunshine though is a necessity. All of the images on this page were taken under such conditions.

Equipment List

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

If you like this article, please share by email or use one of the share buttons beneath the article.

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Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Death Valley: Aguereberry Point and Aguereberry Camp – Christmas Eve Fog

Death Valley National Park is a phenomenal study of erosion, weather, geology, sand dunes, salt formations, and huge spring wildflower blooms on rare occasions.

Aguereberry Point is one of my must-see areas in the park.

The point’s elevation reaches 6,433 ft and is named for Jean Pierre “Pete” Aguereberry, a Basque miner who was born in 1874, emigrated from France in 1890, and lived at and worked the nearby Eureka Mine from 1905 to his death in 1945.

The road to the top is very rough. The park recommends a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle. I took the trip on numerous occasions in a regular car, but you better be comfortable driving in some very unpleasant looking spots, and you better not make a mistake navigating the ruts. I saw two jeeps with flat tires, undoubtedly driving too fast or not paying attention.

The road is a bit hair-raising the first time you go to the top. After you have done it once the next time seems easy or at least easier. There is no place to turn around once you start the climb.

The feature image is from a magical trip on Christmas Eve. It was completely fogged in on the way up, with some snow falling, and I was wondering what the hell I was even doing. Towards sunset, the fog lifted.

There is no view until you reach the top.

Feature Image Details

The feature image is a single shot, not a composite or focus stack.

Here are some additional images. All the ones with fog or snow were taken on Christmas Eve.

The above image is a focus stack of three images. I was inches away from the rock. The stack is at the point closest to me, then in the middle of the rock group, then at infinity.

That image was taken at another time, one Spring.

Don’t overlook the details. There are numerous opportunities for colorful lichens on marble. These kinds of images look best in quiet light. I took that image after sunset.

Aguereberry Camp

Those not interested in taking the road up to the top can make it to the Aguereberry Camp, “Pete” Aguereberry’s homestead, and the nearby Eureka Mine, relatively easily.

The road all the way is brutal deadpan so you must drive slow and watch for rocks. There are no ruts or real danger of bottoming the car if one is reasonably careful.

This is what’s left of Aguereberry Camp.

I took that car image one morning shortly after sunrise. Anyone recognize the car?

Equipment List

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

If you missed them, please check out my previous articles.

  1. Death Valley: Zabriskie Point Sunrise, Manly Beacon
  2. Death Valley: Dante’s View Sunrise
  3. Death Valley: Artist’s Palette
  4. Death Valley: Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes Sunset
  5. Death Valley: Badwater, Salt Polygons, Devil’s Golf Course
  6. Death Valley: Golden Canyon Sunset and Moonrise Images
  7. Death Valley: Natural Bridge, It’s Another World

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If you like this article, please share by email or use one of the share buttons beneath the article.

Much more coming: Click to Subscribe by Email.

Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Death Valley: Natural Bridge, It’s Another World

Death Valley National Park is a phenomenal study of erosion, weather, geology, sand dunes, salt formations, and huge spring wildflower blooms on rare occasions.

This post covers the Natural Bridge Trail, a two+ mile out-and-back round-trip. It’s an easy hike that passes under a natural bridge with views of faults, chutes, dry waterfalls and other formations.

The geologic formations and metallic-hued lava flows are out of this world.

If you only have a couple days in the park, this would not be one of my top choices to visit. But if you have a week, please take the time to explore the area.

Feature Image Details

This is a composite image of two exposures. There is one exposure for the bridge and a second exposure for the background mountains covered in snow.

I purposely did not include sky above the bridge making the shot look more like a hole in the wall rather than a natural bridge.  The feature image is from behind, looking back towards the trailhead.

Here is another view, as one would see the scene hiking towards the bridge.

I have seen the above shot with wild blue, green, and yellow colors. Such images are fakes. The color on the bridge, at any time of day, is simply not that vibrant.

The best part of the trail is towards the end. The metallic-looking lava flows and marble formations do not appear to be from this world.

The trail dead ends at this point.

It’s a relatively easy scramble up that lava flow for a view looking back towards the trailhead. This is what it looks like.

The above image was taken with my Canon 16-35MM F4 L Lens at 16mm.

Blending

Every image in this set is a composite image. By that I mean I took multiple exposures for the brightest and darkest parts of the second and blended them manually, in Photoshop. I use the fewest number of exposures I can get away with. My preference is one.

All of these images were a blend of two exposures. On occasion, I use three.

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

If you missed them, please check out my previous articles.

  1. Death Valley: Zabriskie Point Sunrise, Manly Beacon
  2. Death Valley: Dante’s View Sunrise
  3. Death Valley: Artist’s Palette
  4. Death Valley: Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes Sunset
  5. Death Valley: Badwater, Salt Polygons, Devil’s Golf Course
  6. Death Valley: Golden Canyon Sunset and Moonrise Images

Share!

If you like this article, please share by email or use one of the share buttons beneath the article.

Much more coming: Click to Subscribe by Email.

Mike “Mish” Shedlock