Rockville Bridge Milky Way and Grafton Ghost Town

The Rockville Bridge and Grafton Ghost Town are just outside Zion National Park. The bridge was built for the National Park Service in 1924 to provide a link between Zion National Park and the North Rim area of Grand Canyon National Park.

The Rockville Bridge is 91 years old now and is showing its age. The Department of Transportation’s inspection of the bridge in 2012 revealed such deterioration that the bridge’s load rating was reduced from 25 to 14 tons and the Town of Rockville was put on notice that “something” needed to be done about the bridge.

Plans were made to put up a new bridge next to the old one but the town objected. In 2016, the Joint Highway Committee allocated $2,500,000 for the Rockville Bridge to be rehabilitated – with the condition that the Town submit a plan for an alternate route for a new road and bridge to cross the Virgin River at another location.

In March of 2017, the Town of Rockville finished raising the matching funds required for the Federal funding of the bridge restoration project. The project is scheduled to get underway in October of 2017.

The preceding three paragraphs are slightly modified excerpts from The Rockford Bridge Organization. The organization has a photo tour.
Continue reading “Rockville Bridge Milky Way and Grafton Ghost Town”

Zion National Park – Autumn – Clear Creek

Clear creek runs parallel to the road through Zion in many places.

For the images in this article, I parked in designated but unnamed parking spots and scrambled down to the creek. I did not run into another person but in several places, I did see footprints on occasion.

The water-carved canyon walls are quite impressive and well worth exploring.

Feature Image Details

The light was fading fast but it was nearly calm so there was little movement in the leaves. In retrospect, I should have used a much higher ISO.

ISO 800 would have provided 4 stops of light. 50-100 is one stop, 100-200 is another stop, 200-400 is the third stop, and 400-800 is the 4th stop.

Each stop doubles or halves the exposure time. Instead of 8 seconds, my exposure would have been 1/2 second.

To achieve the depth of field in the images, I used a technique called focus stacking. I focused on the wall in one image and the background in another. Two images are generally insufficient for focus stacking but that is all I took.

One can combine the images manually or use a program like “Zerene Stacker“. I was forced to do a manual combination as I accidentally shifted the camera slightly between images and they did not line up.

Thus, I made a lot of mistakes, but I am pleased with the final result.

Additional Clear Creek Image

Scrambling Tips

The key to these images is easy: Get off the beaten path and explore!

There is nothing difficult about the preceding image other than scrambling down the hillside with no marked trail to get to the creek bed. I took the above image about 15 minutes before the feature image.

I almost stopped at that point because the light was fading fast but an inner voice said look around the next bend. The result was one of my favorite images from the trip.

When you are off the trail, please look around you in all directions even if you have a Garmin or other tracking device. It’s important to know how to get back out, whether or not your tracking device fails.

I frequently leave cairns for myself. In this case I didn’t because I have an excellent memory for features, even individual rocks. When in doubt, please mark your spot so you know how to get back to your car.

Other Zion National Park Articles 

  1. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Three – Inside the Subway
  2. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack
  3. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls
  4. Zion National Park Autumn – Great White Throne
  5. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 1
  6. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 2 (After a Rainfall)
  7. Zion National Park – Autumn – Middle and Upper Emerald Pools
  8. Zion National Park – The Watchman – Autumn
  9. Zion National Park – Autumn – Hiking “The Narrows” Part I
  10. Zion National Park – Autumn – Hiking “The Narrows” Part II
  11. Zion National Park – Autumn – Hiking “The Narrows” Part III

Equipment

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Zion National Park – Autumn – Hiking “The Narrows” Part III

This is the third and final of a series of posts that covers the “Narrows”, a hike whose only trail is the Virgin River itself. Some parts of the hike are relatively open, but other sections are narrow, between water-carved sandstone walls rising over a hundred feet on each side of the river.

In the summer you can hike in shorts, but in November, when we went, a wetsuit is best.

Water carved beautiful shapes in the canyon walls that rise up on both sides you for hundreds of feet.

If you are in or near the narrows in a flash flood, you will not survive as there is no reachable high ground.

Tip List

  1. Get up early. Be in the river at dawn. If you wait until later in the day there will be masses of people in every shot.
  2. Rent your gear the night before.
  3. Turn around. Look behind you every few minutes. Light in the canyon can change fast
  4. If you see a section of the canyon you like and it is not lit up with reflected light, try again a half hour or so later.
  5. Once you reach the section of the canyon of the feature image with nearby ferns on the wall, the best sections of the narrows are downstream. I recommend spending more time in the narrows than going further upstream.
  6. Be careful with vibrations. The water may move your tripod if the sand or rocks below it shift on long exposures.
  7. Consider taking one exposure for the canyon walls and another longer exposure to smooth the water.
  8. Reflected light is best. Avoid the sky and any direct light on the canyon walls.
  9. I only used two lenses in the narrows: a 16-35MM lens and a 24-105MM lens. Long heavy lenses are not useful and will weigh you down.
  10. Rent a half wetsuit rather than a full one. The latter is too hot and too cumbersome when you have to pee.

Feature Image Details

Additional Images

Reflected light is the key images in the Narrows in general. There is no sunlight on the water or the canyon walls. Rather the light hits one canyon wall and bounces off it providing a glow everywhere else.

I used a polarizer on this image as I did every image in the Narrows.

Moving Water

There is no tripod movement if you are braced on hard rock. But in the water, currents can vibrate the tripod resulting in an image that looks nice on the playback screen but is actually a little soft.

In this particular area, I ruined a lot of images and could not figure out why until much later.

If I am in the narrows again, I will take a much faster image of the walls at a higher ISO then a slower image to get the water the way I like.

Gear

We rented wetsuits, hiking poles, and shoes suitable for river hiking.

For an image of the rental gear you will need, please see link #9 below. There are numerous places just outside the park to rent equipment.

I only took two lenses with me: A  Canon 16-35MM F4 L Lens and a Canon 24-105MM F4 L Lens.  Add a polarizer and a tripod (the latter is a necessity), and that is all you will need. If you are in the canyon and you think you need a flash, you are shooting in the wrong light.

I saw people carrying massive telephoto lenses and I was constantly wondering “What they hell do they need those lenses for?”

The hike is not strenuous if the water level is low. If the water level is high and fast, they close the hike. There is no elevation change but you are hiking in the river, against the current on the way in.

Relatively speaking, I found the upper Emerald Pools Trail more difficult than the Narrows, but we were fortunate to have easy conditions. The rental places and the park visitor center can assist if you have questions.

Other Zion National Park Images

  1. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Three – Inside the Subway
  2. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack
  3. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls
  4. Zion National Park Autumn – Great White Throne
  5. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 1
  6. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 2 (After a Rainfall)
  7. Zion National Park – Autumn – Middle and Upper Emerald Pools
  8. Zion National Park – The Watchman – Autumn
  9. Zion National Park – Autumn – Hiking “The Narrows” Part I
  10. Zion National Park – Autumn – Hiking “The Narrows” Part II

Equipment

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Zion National Park – Autumn – Hiking “The Narrows” Part II

This is the second in a series of posts that covers the “Narrows”, a hike whose only trail is the Virgin River itself. Some parts of the hike are relatively open, but other sections are narrow, between water-carved sandstone walls rising over a hundred feet on each side of the river.

In the summer you can hike in shorts, but in November, when we went, a wetsuit is best.

The feature image is the classic view of the narrows. Water carved beautiful shapes in the canyon walls that rise up on both sides you for hundreds of feet.

If you are in or near the narrows in a flash flood, you will not survive as there is no reachable high ground.

Feature Image Details

Reflected light is the key to this image, and images in the Narrows in general. There is no sunlight on the water or the canyon walls. Rather the light hits one canyon wall and bounces off it providing a glow everywhere else.

I used a polarizer on this image as I did every image in the Narrows.

Additional images near this location.

 

Exposure Tip

There is no tripod movement if you are braced on hard rock. But in the water, currents can vibrate the tripod resulting in an image that looks nice on the playback screen but is actually a little soft.

In this particular area, I ruined a lot of images and could not figure out why until much later.

If I am in the narrows again, I will take a much faster image of the walls at a higher ISO then a slower image to get the water the way I like.

Gear

We rented wetsuits, hiking poles, and shoes suitable for river hiking. For an image of the rental gear you will need, please see link #9 below. There are numerous places just outside the park to rent equipment.

I only took two lenses with me: A  Canon 16-35MM F4 L Lens and a Canon 24-105MM F4 L Lens.  Add a polarizer and a tripod (the latter is a necessity), and that is all you will need. If you are in the canyon and you think you need a flash, you are shooting in the wrong light.

I saw people carrying massive telephoto lenses and I was constantly wondering “What they hell do they need those lenses for?”

The hike is not strenuous if the water level is low. If the water level is high and fast, they close the hike. There is no elevation change but you are hiking in the river, against the current on the way in.

Relatively speaking, I found the upper Emerald Pools Trail more difficult than the Narrows, but we were fortunate to have easy conditions. The rental places and the park visitor center can assist if you have questions.

Other Zion National Park Images

  1. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Three – Inside the Subway
  2. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack
  3. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls
  4. Zion National Park Autumn – Great White Throne
  5. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 1
  6. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 2 (After a Rainfall)
  7. Zion National Park – Autumn – Middle and Upper Emerald Pools
  8. Zion National Park – The Watchman – Autumn
  9. Zion National Park – Autumn – Hiking “The Narrows” Part I

Equipment

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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Coming up:  More Narrows 

Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Zion National Park – Autumn – Hiking “The Narrows” Part I

The premier hikes in Zion National Part are “The Subway” and “The Narrows”. Competition for the Subway is intense and there is a lottery system as explained in my previous posts (links below).

This set of posts covers the “Narrows”, a hike whose only trail is the Virgin River itself. Some parts of the hike are relatively open, but other sections are narrow, between water-carved sandstone walls rising over a hundred feet on each side of the river.

In the summer you can hike in shorts, but in November, when we went, a wetsuit is best. The feature image is just before the narrows. I have more dramatic images coming up, but I like autumn colors and the stream reflections in this image.

Feature Image Details

Reflected light is the key to this image, and images in the Narrows in general. There is no sunlight on the water, the tree or the canyon walls. Rather the light hits one canyon wall and bounces off it providing a glow everywhere else.

I used a polarizer on this image as I did every image in the Narrows.

Many photographers carried cell phones with HDR (High Dynamic Range) programs to see what images would look like before deciding whether or not to taking their cameras out of their dry bags and setup.

It seemed easy enough to me to tell whether or not I liked an image without having to rely on a cell phone app to check.

Narrows Equipment

That’s what hiking the Narrows looks like. I took the image using my tripod and a self-timer: ISO 800, 21mm, F13, 1/5 second.

We rented wetsuits, hiking poles, and shoes suitable for river hiking. In addition, I rented a dry bag for my camera (the gray bag in front of me). Those are full wetsuits. Unless it is really cold, I strongly recommend a half wetsuit. If you have to pee, full wetsuits are more than a minor nuisance.

There are numerous places just outside the park to rent equipment.

On my back is a CamelBak Backpack. CamelBak makes a great hiking pack. The model I have is called HAWG NV. On B&H, the equivalent seems to be the Fourteener 24 22 L Hydration Backpack with 3L Reservoir. This is a wonderfully light pack and it comes with a water hydration system. It is well constructed and I am not worried about leakage. Pick one that meets your needs. In addition to 3 liters of water, the backpack will hold a couple of lenses, batteries, a flashlight, filters, ect., but not large lenses.

I only took two lenses with me: A  Canon 16-35MM F4 L Lens and a Canon 24-105MM F4 L Lens.  Add a polarizer and a tripod (the latter is a necessity), and that is all you will need. If you are in the canyon and you think you need a flash, you are shooting in the wrong light.

I saw people carrying massive telephoto lenses and I was constantly wondering “What they hell do they need those lenses for?”

The hike is not strenuous if the water level is low. If the water level is high and fast, they close the hike. If a big rainstorm is on the way, you will not survive the narrowest sections.

There is no elevation change but you are hiking in the river, against the current on the way in.

Riverwalk Area

 

One can take the above image without getting wet.

Relatively speaking, I found the upper Emerald Pools Trail more difficult than the Narrows, but we were fortunate to have easy conditions. The rental places and the park visitor center can assist if you have questions.

Other Zion National Park Images

  1. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Three – Inside the Subway
  2. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack
  3. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls
  4. Zion National Park Autumn – Great White Throne
  5. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 1
  6. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 2 (After a Rainfall)
  7. Zion National Park – Autumn – Middle and Upper Emerald Pools
  8. Zion National Park – The Watchman – Autumn

Equipment

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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Coming up:  More Narrows 

Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Zion National Park – The Watchman – Autumn

Everyone wants an iconic image of the Watchman. An hour or more before sunset, people line up on a bridge that provides the viewpoint. You will stand shoulder to shoulder, assuming you can find a parking spot and photography spot.

There are white painted lines on the bridge that give each photographer his 24 inches of space or whatever it is. Spots directly over the Virgin River are the most coveted spots. To get a good spot, you may need to be two or more hours early.

Feature Image Details

The guidebooks all say to be on the bridge at sunset. Phooey. I took the feature image in the early afternoon. I had the entire bridge to myself.

There was nothing in the near foreground so F8 was quite adequate. Shortly after I took the above image, the clouds dissipated but the crowds came pouring in.

At sunset, in November, there is no light at all on the cottonwood trees. And if there are no clouds coupled with deep shadows on the trees, there is not much of an image. Nonetheless, nearly every day, people stacked up, waiting hours for a shot could not happen under the existing light.

In such conditions, I suggest doing something else. Anything else. We went hiking on the Emerald Pools trails for the second time rather than fight the crowds.

Other Zion National Park Images

  1. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Three – Inside the Subway
  2. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack
  3. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls
  4. Zion National Park Autumn – Great White Throne
  5. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 1
  6. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 2 (After a Rainfall)
  7. Zion National Park – Autumn – Middle and Upper Emerald Pools

Equipment

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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Coming up: Hiking the Narrows.

The Narrows is a premier hike in Zion, second only to “The Subway” see links 1-3 above.

Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Zion National Park – Autumn – Middle and Upper Emerald Pools

The Emerald Pools trail is an easy hike, but what’s easy for Zion might be described as moderate somewhere else.  If you had trouble getting to Lower or Middle Emerald Pools, then go no further as the trail to the base of the upper waterfall is steeper and much more of a scramble with some loose rocks.

Feature Image Details

Middle Emerald does not have much of a waterfall, but it does pool water that can make for a very nice reflection on occasion. However, there are chains to deal with and the water was a bit brackish so I passed up the reflection shot for the one shown above.

Lower and Upper Emerald Pools 

The image below shows the Lower and Emerald Pools waterfalls from roughly the Middle Emerald Pools elevation. The water was not flowing heavily for this image.

I did not find the Upper Emerald Pools waterfall that photogenic from close up, and have no images to offer. It’s a nice hike and a powerful waterfall with lots of spray, but I do not think I even attempted an image. If pressed for time, my experience says skip it. If you are looking for a nice hike, go for it.

Other Zion National Park Images

  1. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Three – Inside the Subway
  2. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack
  3. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls
  4. Zion National Park Autumn – Great White Throne
  5. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 1
  6. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 2 (After a Rainfall)

Coming up: The Watchman, then Hiking the Narrows.

Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 2 (After a Rainfall)

The Emerald Pools trail is an easy hike, but it is uphill to the falls (assuming there is any water flowing). What’s easy for Zion might be described as moderate somewhere else.

During our stay we hiked the Emerald Pools trail several times. On our last hike there was much more water flowing but many leaves had fallen off. These images were after a rainstorm.

Feature Image Details

Using ISO 50 on Canon is a mistake that I was unaware of on the Zion trip. ISO 50 can make shadow details a bit worse. If wind and other conditions permit, ISO 100 is the best choice.

The feature image is a set of several images combined in a manual HDR process using luminosity masks and curves.  I cannot say I recommend the procedure as it takes a long time to master. Luminosity masks are very complex to setup for the casual user.

Lightroom has HDR merge, but it did not do a good job on this image. There are HDR programs for a Mac that are highly acclaimed. They will be available for a PC this Autumn.

The software tools use luminosity masks so you do not need to learn them directly.

Starburst Explanation

It is easy to produce a natural looking starburst without filters by positioning the sun on the edge of an object. The star is caused by light bending around the diaphragm blades of the lens.

In this case, I positioned the sun right on the edge of the cliff. One can use a tree branch, edge of a building or any other suitable object.

Some lenses produce better starbursts than other. The 9-bladed Canon 16-35 MM lens produces an exceptional star. Canon’s 14 MM lens only has 4 blades and produces a relatively poor star.

An even number of diaphragm blades provides that many rays. An odd number provides double.

Additional Lower Emerald Pool Image

Other Zion National Park Images

  1. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Three – Inside the Subway
  2. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack
  3. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls
  4. Zion National Park Autumn – Great White Throne
  5. Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 1

Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Zion National Park – Autumn – Lower Emerald Pools Part 1

Hiking and exploring opportunities in Zion National Park Utah are nearly endless. My favorite time of year is Autumn. I recommend staying in the park lodge, but don’t try to book at the last moment.

Before your trip, the first thing you should do is pick up Joe’s Guide to Zion National Park. It’s free. Joe describes all the major trails and offers recommended hikes.

The Emerald Pools trail is an easy hike, but it is uphill to the falls (assuming there is any water flowing). What’s easy for Zion might be described as moderate somewhere else.

During our stay we hiked the Emerald Pools trail several times. On our last hike there was much more water flowing but many leaves had fallen off. These images were before the rainstorm.

Feature Image Details

Additional Lower Emerald Pool Image

Other Zion National Park Images

  1. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Three – Inside the Subway
  2. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack
  3. Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls
  4. Zion National Park Autumn – Great White Throne

Equipment List

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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If you like this article, please share by email or use one of the share buttons beneath the article.

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Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Three – Inside the Subway

The first major stop on the Subway Trek is Archangel Falls, covered in part 1 of the Subway trek. Moving upstream, one comes up to a flat area where flowing water carved a deep crack in an otherwise flat surface. The second area is known and “The Crack” and was covered in part 2.

This set of images is from inside the Subway.

Feature Image Details

The key to this image is reflected light. In fact, that is the key to all the images in the subway series. Direct sunlight would ruin any of the shots.

There is no direct light in the subway, but you do need strong sun and no clouds to have light bouncing off the canyon walls to light up the subways walls. Noon, normally an awful time for photography, is perfect for the subway (at least it was in November when we went on the trek).

Polarizers help intensify the colors. They also increase the shutter speed, a very desirable effect to enhance the swirls.

Hike Comments

The subway hike is 6.5 miles round-trip and is rated strenuous. I would rate it moderately-strenuous. The elevation change is mostly gradual except for a steep 600-foot change at the beginning (down) and end (up).

For comparison purposes, I would rate Angel’s Landing with a 1500 foot elevation change as strenuous. Yet, the Subway requires scrambling and the trail is very slippery in spots. I fell twice and one person slipped into the pool at the Subway (it’s deep). Get or rent a pair of shoes suitable for wet slippery conditions. The outfitters near the park can help.

Mark your entry/exit spot with GPS, by time, or both. There is no clear path to the end of the Subway trail. Two hikers we came across were convinced they passed the exit spot. They were going to scramble up loose rocks to the top. They were convinced their car was at the gap at the top. I talked them out of it.

It is better to be lost on the main route than lost where only a search party may find you. It turns out, they were a mile away from the path up.

Lens Selection

If I had to pick two general purpose lenses, the 16-35 and the 24-105 would be clear standouts. Those were the only two lenses I had with me for this 6.5 mile hike.

Reduce weight and hike happier!

Since there is overlap, I would prefer the second lens to be 35-135 or 35-150 instead of 24-105. Canon does not make my preferred choice.

Equipment

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

Second Subway Image

Notice the flowing water next to the wall on the upward slope. That area is extremely slippery. One person took a plunge. The waterfall and the cascade in opposite directions show the source of the beautiful swirls.

What Could I have Done Better?

I always ask myself “What could I have done better”. In this case, I should have used a longer exposure. Most of my images showed few swirl patterns that I like, but these images did have nice swirls. A longer exposure would have been much better. Somewhere between 30 seconds and a minute would likely have been ideal.

A problem with anything over 30 seconds involves “sharing”. About 5-6 people can take the first image without getting into each other’s way, but precisely one person fits in the spot immediately above. Also, the above image requires others to back off. You cannot exactly ask six people to back off while you take a 2-minute exposure.

I got the image when a cloud passed overhead, the light vanished, and most of the people left. The light came back out and there were only a few of us still inside the subway. The others did back out for the time it took to get the image.

The waterfall shot was at 16mm. 14mm would have captured more of the subway walls. But 14mm would have been too wide, making it very hard for people to get out of the way.  Also, you cannot use a  polarizer or filters of any kind, other than gel filters in the rear, with the Canon 14MM F2.8 L Lens.

More Subway Images

For more information regarding the “Subway Trek” and a nice shot of Archangel Falls as well, please see Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls

Also, see Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack

Equipment List

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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If you like this article, please share by email or use one of the share buttons beneath the article.

You can also follow me on Twitter! I have both an economic forum and a photography forum.

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Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part Two – The Crack

The first major stop on the Subway Trek is Archangel Falls, covered in my last post. Moving upstream, one comes up to a flat area where flowing water carved a deep crack in an otherwise flat surface.

The area around The Crack” is exceptionally slippery. I fell twice as did a couple of other people. I recommend having or renting a pair of shoes suitable for such conditions. I had no such shoes and paid the price. The weather was warm enough we did not rent wetsuits but such gear is nearly mandatory for hiking “The Narrows”

Feature Image Details

Someone asked me what the yellow leaves were in the Archangel Falls image. Apologies for the delay in answering. There are at three different yellow leaves. There are smooth oval leaves and I do not know what those are at all. Aspens, Poplars, and Cottonwoods are all in the same general family, and they are toothed. The aspens are generally yellow. I do not know the variety. Bigtooth maples can also be yellow but they were mainly red or orange.

The red and orange leaves, and a couple of the yellow ones in this feature image are bigtooth maples. I have more images of brilliant maples coming up later.

Perspective Control

The best way to take this image is pointing straight down. Otherwise, you will see the railroad track effect. To shoot straight down, one needs a tripod with a center arm that will collapse to a horizontal position. My tripod does that, but that setup takes more time, and people were stacking up behind us. I did not want to get to the Subway so late as to miss the best light or not get a good position.

My straight-up image of the crack does have a bit of a railroad track effect, but I partially corrected that in Lightroom.  Here is the image without perspective modification.

Notice the leaves get smaller away from the lower end of the photo. I could not eliminate the railroad track perspective issue completely without causing unwanted cropping distortions, but the effect is barely noticeable now. The next image shows how.

When you change perspective, you will end up clipping a portion of the image.

It is conceptually easier to simply take the shot horizontally and display it vertically but I kept getting my tripod legs into the picture. Again, using an extension arm that moves horizontally is the correct approach.

I intended to take more images of the crack after photographing the subway but the light had changed. Direct sunlight ruined the shot.

Hike Comments

The subway hike is 6.5 miles round-trip and is rated strenuous. I would rate it moderately-strenuous. The elevation change is mostly gradual except for a steep 600-foot change at the beginning (down) and end (up).

For comparison purposes, I would rate Angel’s Landing with a 1500 foot elevation change as strenuous. Yet, the Subway requires scrambling and the trail is very slippery in spots. I fell twice and one person slipped into the pool at the Subway (it’s deep). Get or rent a pair of shoes suitable for wet slippery conditions. The outfitters near the park can help.

Mark your entry/exit spot with GPS, by time, or both. There is no clear path to the end of the Subway trail. Two hikers we came across were convinced they passed the exit spot. They were going to scramble up loose rocks to the top. They were convinced their car was at the gap at the top. I talked them out of it.

It is better to be lost on the main route than lost where only a search party may find you. It turns out, they were a mile away from the path up.

Light Tips

To get the best images, be at the trailhead before dawn and set out as soon as you can see, if not before (using headlamps). Once the sun hits the waterfalls the best light is gone. Reflected light is best. Strong reflected light is required for a great shot in the Subway itself.

Lens Selection

If I had to pick two general purpose lenses, the 16-35 and the 24-105 would be clear standouts. Those were the only two lenses I had with me for this 6.5 mile hike.

Reduce weight and hike happier!

Since there is overlap, I would prefer the second lens to be 35-135 or 35-150 instead of 24-105. Canon does not make my preferred choice.

Equipment

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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Next up “Inside the Subway”

For more information regarding the “Subway Trek” and a nice shot of Archangel Falls as well, please see Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls

Equipment List

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls

The “Subway” is the premier hike in Zion National Park.

The route is not suitable for masses of photographers all vying for the same spot at the same time. The park’s solution is a lottery system and competition for slots is very high.

We went in the second week in November. Starting in November there may be openings without having to use the lottery system. That was the case for us. As an added bonus on our trip, Autumn was a week late so our timing was perfect.

Feature Image Details

Here is the image from the lottery link above.

Yikes!

The light is clearly better in my shot but that is not my key point. Notice the viewpoint angle. I was very low and very close to the waterfall, no more than a foot away. I was also inches above the river bed. In the group I was with, the photographers were all standing up, taking pictures at eye level. Their perspective was similar to that in the brochure.

Also, instead of standing mid-stream, I stood way to the left as that was the prettiest rock formation. Finally, a long exposure (3.2 seconds) provides a nice smooth flow to the water.

Joe’s Guide

Before your trip, the first thing you should do is pick up Joe’s Guide to Zion National Park. It’s free. Joe describes all the major trails and offers recommended hikes including information on the Subway.

Hike Comments

The subway hike is 6.5 miles round-trip and is rated strenuous. I would rate it moderately-strenuous. The elevation change is mostly gradual except for a steep 600-foot change at the beginning (down) and end (up).

For comparison purposes, I would rate Angel’s Landing with a 1500 foot elevation change as strenuous. Yet, the Subway requires scrambling and the trail is very slippery in spots. I fell twice and one person slipped into the pool at the Subway (it’s deep). Get or rent a pair of shoes suitable for wet slippery conditions. The outfitters near the park can help.

Mark your entry/exit spot with GPS, by time, or both. There is no clear path to the end of the Subway trail. Two hikers we came across were convinced they passed the exit spot. They were going to scramble up loose rocks to the top. They were convinced their car was at the gap at the top. I talked them out of it.

It is better to be lost on the main route than lost where only a search party may find you. It turns out, they were a mile away from the path up.

Light Tips

To get the best images, be at the trailhead before dawn and set out as soon as you can see, if not before (using headlamps). Once the sun hits the waterfalls the best light is gone. Reflected light is best. Strong reflected light is required for a great shot in the Subway itself.

Equipment

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

Please Share!

If you like this article, please share by email or use one of the share buttons beneath the article.

Much more coming: Click to Subscribe by Email.

Next up “The Crack”

Mike “Mish” Shedlock