Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls

The “Subway” is the premier hike in Zion National Park.

The route is not suitable for masses of photographers all vying for the same spot at the same time. The park’s solution is a lottery system and competition for slots is very high.

We went in the second week in November. Starting in November there may be openings without having to use the lottery system. That was the case for us. As an added bonus on our trip, Autumn was a week late so our timing was perfect.

Feature Image Details

Here is the image from the lottery link above.

Yikes!

The light is clearly better in my shot but that is not my key point. Notice the viewpoint angle. I was very low and very close to the waterfall, no more than a foot away. I was also inches above the river bed. In the group I was with, the photographers were all standing up, taking pictures at eye level. Their perspective was similar to that in the brochure.

Also, instead of standing mid-stream, I stood way to the left as that was the prettiest rock formation. Finally, a long exposure (3.2 seconds) provides a nice smooth flow to the water.

Joe’s Guide

Before your trip, the first thing you should do is pick up Joe’s Guide to Zion National Park. It’s free. Joe describes all the major trails and offers recommended hikes including information on the Subway.

There are other cascades on the Subway route before you get to “The Crack” and “The Subway”. Here are a couple of images.

Both of those images were taken with a Canon 24-105MM F4 L Lens at 24mm (left) and 28mm (right).

If I had to pick two general purpose lenses, the 16-35 and the 24-105 would be clear standouts. Since there is overlap, I would prefer the second lens to be 35-135 or 35-150 instead of 24-105. Canon does not make my preferred choice.

Hike Comments

The subway hike is 6.5 miles round-trip and is rated strenuous. I would rate it moderately-strenuous. The elevation change is mostly gradual except for a steep 600-foot change at the beginning (down) and end (up).

For comparison purposes, I would rate Angel’s Landing with a 1500 foot elevation change as strenuous. Yet, the Subway requires scrambling and the trail is very slippery in spots. I fell twice and one person slipped into the pool at the Subway (it’s deep). Get or rent a pair of shoes suitable for wet slippery conditions. The outfitters near the park can help.

Mark your entry/exit spot with GPS, by time, or both. There is no clear path to the end of the Subway trail. Two hikers we came across were convinced they passed the exit spot. They were going to scramble up loose rocks to the top. They were convinced their car was at the gap at the top. I talked them out of it.

It is better to be lost on the main route than lost where only a search party may find you. It turns out, they were a mile away from the path up.

Light Tips

To get the best images, be at the trailhead before dawn and set out as soon as you can see, if not before (using headlamps). Once the sun hits the waterfalls the best light is gone. Reflected light is best. Strong reflected light is required for a great shot in the Subway itself.

Equipment

Those interested in my equipment and recommendations can find it here: Mish’s Equipment List.

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Next up “The Crack”

Mike “Mish” Shedlock

5 thoughts on “Zion National Park – Subway Trek Part One – Archangel Falls

    1. Zooming in, some leaves are oval some pointed or jagged
      I do not know what the rounded ones are
      Pointed are most like some kind of Aspens but Cottonwoods may also be in the shot
      Sorry for the delay!

      Like

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